Hong Kong Horseracing News

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Nakayama Racecourse hosts the G1 Arima Kinen, Japan’s most-beloved race, on Sunday, 22 December. The 2500m turf event over a right-handed track attracts Japan’s best talent and the stakes are high, with a first-place prize matching the G1 Japan Cup’s 300 million yen.

The race’s 64th running boasts one of its most impressive lineups in recent years, with 11 G1 winners among the full field of 16 runners. Ages range from three to seven, with older horses assigned 126lb and a 5lb-allowance given to the females and the three-year-olds.

The ladies are well represented this year with a total of five female runners. Youth this year is especially strong, with a trio of three-year-olds all attracting a good share of attention, especially with Blast Onepiece’s victory last year still fresh in memories. Arima Kinen veterans Rey de Oro, Suave Richard and Kiseki are back for second tries and Cheval Grand takes on his fourth Arima challenge.

Fan ballots help determine which runners compete, and this year, not only will the top four horses from the voting be in the race, 10 of the top 13 horses fans most want to see run in the Arima Kinen are ready to clash.

The real gem among them, is of course, Almond Eye. The virtually invincible filly was the favourite in the fan voting. At the time ballots were being cast, the plan was to race her in Hong Kong and pass on the Arima. But an elevated temperature close to her intended departure for Hong Kong meant that Almond Eye was hurriedly nominated for the Arima Kinen.

A winner of six Grade 1 events, including victories both at home and abroad, Almond Eye comes off an impressive first-place in the autumn version of the Tenno Sho (2000m, Tokyo) on 27 October. She’s never finished out of the money, but she’s also never raced at Nakayama. Christophe Lemaire is in the saddle.

Early odds predictions have Almond Eye the shoo-in favourite, followed by Lys Gracieux. Three-year-olds Saturnalia and World Premiere follow and after them are Fierement, Suave Richard, Velox and Kiseki. Rey de Oro, Aerolithe, Etario and Al Ain, all too good to dismiss.

The Yoshito Yahagi-trained Lys Gracieux, second in the G1 LONGINES Hong Kong Vase (2400m) last year and third in the FWD QEII Cup (2000m) at Sha Tin in April, returned home to win the G1 Takarazuka Kinen (2200m, Hanshin) this spring by three lengths, then returned in October for a Cox Plate (G1, 2040m) win. The Arima, which marks her first time at Nakayama, is to be her last run and she’s to be partnered with Aussie Damian Lane, also racing for the first time at Nakayama.

Of the three-year-olds in the spotlight this year, odds are currently lowest on Saturnalia. The Katsuhiko Sumii-trained colt had already won a G1 at Nakayama before he claimed the Satsuki Sho this spring. That first G1 was the Hopeful Stakes for two-year-olds. Fourth in the Japanese Derby, Saturnalia finished sixth in the Tenno Sho Autumn. Christophe Soumillon is up.

World Premiere is on his third start since returning from the spring. He ran third in the G2 Kobe Shimbun Hai (2400m) before capturing the 3000m classic, the Kikuka Sho, and will be paired with three-time Arima Kinen winner Yutaka Take.

Velox is the third three-year-old in the mix. He hasn’t won a big one yet, but he posted a second and two thirds in the classics. Yuga Kawada, Japan’s current No. 2 just 11 wins behind Lemaire, is in the saddle.

Having finished last in the G1 Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe (2400m) in October, Fierement is looking to save face on his first start back home. The heavy going at Longchamp took a lot out of him, but he’s a colt with a lot to give. After claiming the Kikuka Sho last year, he went on to capture the G1 Tenno Sho Spring over 3200m at Kyoto that put him ahead of this month’s G1 LONGINES Hong Kong Vase (2400m) winner Glory Vase by a neck.

Kiseki fared better in the Arc with a seventh-place finish. He hasn’t made the winner’s circle since the 2017 Kikuka Sho but he has posted two seconds in top-level races this year and is a strong choice to fill out a trio, especially with ace Ryan Moore in the saddle.

Post time for the Arima Kinen, the 11th race on the Nakayama card, is 2.25pm Hong Kong time.

Win Bright completes spring autumn double to complete joyous treble for Japan09 Dec 2019

Win Bright produced a performance hallmarked with toughness to go with his considerable class to complete the Group 1 double of the LONGINES Hong Kong Cup (2000m) and April’s FWD QEII Cup (2000m) for trainer Yoshihiro Hatakeyama and jockey Masami Matsuoka.

In doing so the steel-grey son of Stay Gold held off the late lunge of Ireland’s Magic Wand to assure the 2019 LONGINES Hong Kong International Races meeting will be remembered as a standout day for Japan’s horsemen, as Win Bright followed Glory Vase and Admire Mars into the Sha Tin winners’ enclosure.

To no great surprise Time Warp got to the first bend a step ahead of his brother Glorious Forever, with Magic Wand and Win Bright making up the second rank of two.

Karis Teetan committed Time Warp at the top of the straight but Matsuoka had angled three wide off the bend and wound Win Bright up for what proved to be an irresistible charge down the straight.

Rise High proved to be the best of those to come from off the pace and looked a threat inside the 200m pole but it was Magic Wand that threw down the final challenge after Ryan Moore had been forced to weave in and around horses, only finding clear sailing late on.

It was a fine ride from Matsuoka, who has been shown great loyalty by owners Win Co Ltd at a time when the fashion has been to go after visiting superstars.

Win Bright was the only horse among nine sent from Japan across the four G1 races to be partnered by a home-born jockey.

“It went the way we were expecting,” Matsuoka said. I thought the pace would be slow so I wanted to sit third or fourth. I was very happy it all went to plan

“We perhaps made our move maybe a bit early as we were carrying plenty of speed into the straight.”

For Hatakeyama, this was a triumphant return to Hong Kong and a brilliant piece of target training, coming as it did off the back of a less-than-inspiring performance when eighth to the all-conquering Almond Eye in the Tenno Sho Autumn.

“After his summer break he couldn’t get into top condition,” Hatakeyama said. “His last two runs were below what I expected but he began to improve straight after the Tenno Sho Autumn and we always wanted to come here if we got the invite.

“He was in really good shape by the time he left Japan and that is why we were able to follow the same routine here as when we came in April.

“Tactically the race went exactly to plan. We wanted to sit handy. At the first bend he tried to tuck in and perhaps put a little pressure to the others. He came home really well in the straight.”

Matsuoka was quick to pay tribute to the trainer’s efforts in getting Win Bright to peak for the day that mattered.

“This is great because his last two starts have not been satisfactory. The horse has been improving all week since he got here. We had a memorable day in April and it is special to come back,” the rider said.

Hatakeyama started out in the mid-1980s as a JRA work-rider and Win Bright’s two triumphs in Hong Kong are the fulfilment of lifelong ambitions sparked by a spell riding out for Irish master trainer John Oxx, a man he described as “a great teacher.”

“When I started training I used to dream all the time about sending my horses to the big overseas Group 1 races and I have been waiting for days like this ever since I got my training licence 20 years ago.”

For the Ballydoyle team there will be a sense that this might have been one that got away, as Magic Wand’s 12th start of 2019 was a luckless one.

Smartly away and never far off the pace, Moore came off the rail in search of a run but was forced to wait a fraction before easing past Furore and onto the heels of Win Bright.

Moore said: “She ran super, she was unlucky. She’s very game.”

The Caspar Fownes-trained Rise High ran a big race under Vincent Ho and proved the best of the home defence, finishing a short-head and half a length behind two genuine international Group 1 performers.

Ho said: “He had a perfect position and travelled very nicely but Win Bright and Magic Wand were too good for him today. It was a good run and I think he will come back stronger.”

It was a performance which suggested big days ahead but, with Hatakeyama planning a third trip to Sha Tin for Win Bright next April, pretenders to the throne know exactly what will be required.

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Plenty to Admire for Soumillon in poignant Hong Kong Mile09 Dec 2019

Admire Mars and an inspired Christophe Soumillon came to the fore in what was an emotional occasion for the Japanese racing industry in the G1 LONGINES Hong Kong Mile (1600m) at Sha Tin today (Sunday, 8 December).

It was not, perhaps, the result that the home town audience yearned for, with the hat-trick seeking Beauty Generation looking as if he would defy his advancing years when cruising into the lead at the 400-metre mark.

Unfortunately for the massed supporters of John Moore’s hugely popular performer, the tank began to empty almost as soon as Zac Purton began to ask Beauty Generation for one final ounce of effort, while a surging pair of rivals were making alarming progress.

Admire Mars, under sustained pressure from his Belgian-born pilot down the home straight, poked his chestnut head in front with only 100 metres remaining and passed the line half a length clear of the advancing Waikuku and Joao Moreira.

The winner carries the recognisable blue and white silks of Riichi Kondo, one of Japan’s most significant owners, who died only a few weeks ago. His widow attended the presentation ceremony, although the horse was still registered under her late husband’s name, and trainer Yasuo Tomomichi, who was wearing the livery of the owner in his suit and tie, was also holding back the tears.

Soumillon said: “He was probably one of the biggest private owners in the Japanese racing industry, he was somebody very famous who loved horses.

“We could see his colours from a long time ago, they won nearly everywhere. We had the bad news a few weeks ago so I’m really proud and happy to take these colours so high today.”

It is actually 11 years since Soumillon’s last victory at this meeting, which also came in the Mile aboard Good Ba Ba. This European winter, however, he has moved his talents to Japan. It was the first time he had partnered Admire Mars, a two-time G1 scorer and winner of five from eight career starts who had seemingly been aimed towards Sha Tin for some time.

“I knew my horse was very strong, although his last run wasn’t that good,” he said. “He was the best two-year-old last year in Japan, probably the best three-year-old in Japan too.

“I knew he could stay that distance quite well, he has good gate speed, he liked the ground, so I was quite happy. I told the lad before the race when I saw the odds on the screen ‘there’s something wrong there because for me he should be in the first four favourites’. I rode my race as if he was the favourite and it paid off.”

With the field carried along steadily for the most part by Ka Ying Star and then Beauty Generation, Soumillon always had something to aim at from his position in midfield.

“The first time I saw Beauty Generation running this year, and last time also, I saw he didn’t have the magic he had last year, so that gave me a chance to think that he was beatable,” he revealed.

“For a few strides I thought Zac would go and then at the 300 metres mark I thought ‘I will grab him’. I felt Joao coming on the outside and he’s flying so much at the moment, I thought it would be hard to push my horse into the line but he did it really well.”

Tomomichi has shown adventure in campaigning horses overseas already, taking the likes of the 2017 Dubai Turf with Vivlos and running Cheval Grand at York and Ascot a few months ago.

“I did think this was going to be a difficult race for a three-year-old to win, but when I saw how he had settled here earlier this week, I thought that he looked really well,” he said.

“Christophe Soumillon had asked to ride the horse, and he gave him a very good ride.”

He continued: “We were all going to wear the same suit and tie together, so it still feels as if Mr Kondo is with us watching the race. He was a big supporter for me for a long time, he had many good horses, and he was a very good person.”

Trainer John Moore had maintained that Beauty Generation, the two-time Hong Kong Horse of the Year, was starting to show a little more sparkle in exercise despite defeats when conceding weight in lead-up races in the Sha Tin Trophy and Jockey Club Mile.

“He was gallant in defeat,” said Moore. “In his last two runs he hasn’t been hitting the line as we’d expect. That’s what Zac said and he confirmed that.

“He’s just not going through the gears when he gets into the straight and he did it again today. The Stewards’ Cup will be his next Group 1 race and we’ll take it race by race from there.”

There were no hard feelings from Moreira, who had another afternoon to cherish at the circuit. Having beaten Beauty Generation in the Jockey Club Mile, Waikuku confirmed places here from the widest gate 10.

“It was an extremely good run, he had to face a tough gate and I had to drag him back,” said the rider.

“He wasn’t having much luck from there but he’s a good second to a good horse. We didn’t have too much luck from the gate and I think that is what has got him beaten. That’s the reason why I pulled him back otherwise I was going to get tracked wide.”

At a ‘Turf World Championships’ that belonged to Japan, the last word should go to Soumillon.

“You can see that wherever the Japanese go, in America, England, France, or even Australia, when they buy mares, they buy the best ones, and when they bring stallions over, they bring the best ones,” he explained.

“They are training horses on tough tracks, they are feeding them really well, trying many kinds of things and it pays off. They won the Melbourne Cup, Hong Kong, Dubai, nearly everywhere. It’s a great achievement and I’m proud to be part of it.”

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Moreira’s Glory in the LONGINES Hong Kong Vase09 Dec 2019

Glory Vase streaked away with the G1 LONGINES Hong Kong Vase (2400m) at Sha Tin this afternoon, Sunday, 8 December.

The Japanese raider with the most fitting of names carried Joao Moreira to his fifth LONGINES Hong Kong International Races win – soon to be six – and his first since he guided Satono Crown to a thrilling Vase score in 2016, also for Japan.

“He ran amazing; the emotion is getting the better of me but that’s what it’s about, winning big races, and today we’ve got another one. To come back and win on a Japanese horse, it makes it all worth it,” said Moreira, who left Hong Kong for Japan for a short while before returning full-time to his adopted home city this time last year.

The 2018 Vase champion and big local hope Exultant strode on from his wide gate to lead the field at the first turn under Zac Purton as Moreira settled his mount into a smooth locomotion a couple of lengths off the pace.

Three-wide off the home turn, Moreira switched to an inside alley as Exultant made for home. Glory Vase, G1-placed but not a winner in that grade before today, quickened to lead at the 200m mark and kept on going, drawing three and a half lengths clear at the line in a swift time of 2m 24.77s.

“I was quite blessed to get in two off the fence, get cover and get him to relax,” the rider said. “I had horses on top of me at the 800 metres but good horses, if they face a tough situation, they just go through with it and he wasn’t any different.

“He just kept himself in the gap and just before we turned for home I was kind of trapped and had to ride for luck. I sneaked on the inside and hoped the gap would come. Fortunately it did.

“When I got the gap he just dashed from the 350 (metres) and I knew I was the winner because I had plenty of horse underneath me and he was just attacking the line as a really good horse would.”

The Brazilian ace was ebullient in victory, beaming and waving to the appreciative crowd and his cohort of fans waving Japan flags and marker pens in the hope of a coveted autograph. Moreira obliged as many as he could.

“It’s a pleasure. It’s always good to win these big races, it’s always going to help your confidence and I’ll be riding the rest of the races with even more confidence knowing that I’ve got good rides,” he said, before making it a four-timer by mid-card with a late-thrusting win aboard Beat The Clock in the second of the majors, the G1 LONGINES Hong Kong Sprint.

Meanwhile, Glory Vase’s trainer Tomohito Ozeki was delighted with his first Hong Kong win.

“I’m overwhelmed,” he said as his Deep Impact four-year-old walked back to unsaddle and have the winner’s sash clipped around his neck.

“Moreira did an amazing job riding the horse. We had a meeting together yesterday and felt good about our chances.

“The plan was to come here, we’ve been targeting this race because we felt the track would suit him and the owner was happy to come. Winning international races like this, this is my job as a trainer, this is the best.”

Japan filled three of the first four places. Christophe Soumillon drove the filly Lucky Lilac to second, with the popular mare Deirdre, under Oisin Murphy, fourth. Exultant in third prevented a Japanese whitewash.

“She was beaten by a better horse,” Soumillon said.

Purton felt the wide draw was too much for Exultant.

“The barrier (14) was always going to make it difficult, so it was what it was. He tried his best and ran well,” he said.

Glory Vase is the third Japanese horse to win the Vase following Stay Gold (2001) and Satono Crown (2016).

Moreira had a LONGINES HKIR double previously in 2014 when Able Friend won the Mile and Designs On Rome took the Cup.

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Indy Champ steps up to take on the Hong Kong challenge06 Dec 2019

In the weeks leading up to the 2019 LONGINES Hong Kong International Races, Silk Racing had three horses in three different races, all with a decent shot to take home the prize. By far, Almond Eye was getting the most attention out of the three. But with her defection, due to a fever prior to departure, the world’s eyes turned to Silk Racing’s next great hope, G1 LONGINES Hong Kong Mile contender and two-time G1 winner Indy Champ.

The four-year-old son of Stay Gold is a horse that in any other year would have been the headliner from the start.

Winning both the G1 Yasuda Kinen and the G1 Mile Championship in one consecutive season is no easy feat and one most recently done by Maurice who then went on to impressively win the 2015 G1 Hong Kong Mile.

The “Beast from the East” has cast a large shadow for most Japanese runners hoping to make a name for themselves in Hong Kong ever since. Indy Champ is no different, but unlike previous challengers, he most closely mirrors Maurice in not only his most recent successes but also his entire career: both horses slowly worked their way up the ranks and, in Indy Champ’s case, he has run more consistently from the beginning than the Beast whose legend he seeks to challenge.

Out of 12 lifetime starts, Indy Champ has never been worse than fourth place and then only twice. He was a bit of a late bloomer as a two-year-old, winning his debut on the last racing day of the year in 2017. He was back in action just two weeks later, winning an allowance by a length and a quarter.

That spring he was entered in two races that could have potentially sent him down the classic road but instead he suffered his first defeat in the 1800m G3 Mainichi Hai where he finished third and again a month later in the 1600m G3 Arlington Cup, where he ran fourth for the first time. Even though he was only a length behind the winner, his connections took that as a sign and gave the colt a break.

He came back with a nail-biting second-place finish in a winners-of-two allowance in mid-June of 2018, but the race set him up perfectly to start a three-race win steak. After minor 1600m wins in July and December, he started off his four-year-old campaign with a bang.

An impressively maturing Indy Champ snapped up the G3 Tokyo Shimbun Hai, again at a mile, in February which included among the vanquished the 2016 Champion two-year-old, a multiple graded stakes winner, and an eventual G1-winning sprinter. In his next start, the G2 Milers Cup, he encountered the second time he would finish fourth, though only a length and a half behind the winner, the highly-talented 2017 champion two-year-old Danon Premium. The colt was given a month off and it proved a winning move.

Still only a one-time G3 winner, Indy Champ was entered in this year’s renewal of the G1 Yasuda Kinen (1600m), the highest profile mile race in Japan. He was up against seven G1 winners and seven other graded stake winners, most several times over.

With the awesome Almond Eye and Danon Premium in the race it seemed like the best he could hope for was third but after a bit of drama at the start and a skilled ride by Yuichi Fukunaga, there was no doubt who the champ was.

Indy Champ sprinted down the stretch to catch the speedy pace-setter Aerolithe and after a brief battle, got his neck in front to win the coveted prize. Despite earning automatic berth into the Breeders’ Cup Mile, it was soon decided that the now G1-winning Indy Champ would take in Hong Kong at the year’s end.

And so, after a four-month break for his impressive win against many of Japan’s best horses. He came back in October with an eye on Sha Tin. The bay ran third in the 1800m G2 Mainichi Okan, which ended up being an amazing prep race for his second G1 challenge, the G1 Mile Championship (1600m) in November.

Despite his performance in the Yasuda Kinen, Indy Champ went into the gates as only the third-favourite. A brilliant turn-of-foot saw him not just win but dominate with a length and a half victory over Danon Premium and fellow Hong Kong Mile contender Persian Knight was a further neck back in third.

He worked his way up the ladder of Japanese racing slowly during his three-year-old season and has become a true superstar in his own right as a four-year-old. In his G1 wins, he stopped the clock at 1m 30.9s and 1m 33.0s: While he still has to take on local superstar and two-time Hong Kong Mile winner Beauty Generation, on paper he has the speed to do so.

Stay Gold has not been known for his relaxed offspring, although the colt appeared at ease in his slower paces early this week. But his nerves were on full display during fast work on Wednesday when he pranced and shied away from the grandstand.

“He was a bit distracted by the grandstand but once we got him focused, he moved well.” said assistant trainer Kenichi Shono on Wednesday.

Prior to Thursday’s barrier draw Shono said: “He is getting better all the time. He really improved a lot from this summer when he won the Yasuda Kinen to the Mile Championship, which I think is evident in his performance. While the local horses here are very strong, he has kept that later condition very well I think in the lead up to this race.”

His connections seemed happy with the draw of post number three, and Damian Lane, who has had many a victory aboard Japanese-breds this past year is en route to take on not only the legendary Beauty Generation but also the legend of Maurice. The vibe from the Indy Champ camp is one of confidence in their chances this weekend, so perhaps the nearly 400 shareholders of Indy Champ could be joining together in a boisterous rendition of “We are the Champions” on Sunday afternoon.

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Almond Eye heads world class stars selected for the LONGINES HKIR21 Nov 2019

Almond Eye is among a stellar line-up of 50 horses selected for the HK$93 million LONGINES Hong Kong International Races at Sha Tin on Sunday, 8 December.

Japan’s superstar filly is just one of the 26 G1 winners set to compete and the headliner among a brilliantly-talented contingent of 24 overseas raiders aiming at this year’s “Turf World Championships”.

The LONGINES HKIR is the sport’s global year-end Group 1 extravaganza and features the HK$28 million LONGINES Hong Kong Cup (2000m), the HK$25 million LONGINES Hong Kong Mile (1600m), the HK$20 million LONGINES Hong Kong Sprint (1200m) and the HK$20 million LONGINES Hong Kong Vase (2400m).

Almond Eye is one of 11 in a powerful cohort from Japan, which also features crack milers Indy Champ, Normcore and Admire Mars, this year’s classic heroine Loves Only You and further star fillies Lucky Lilac and the talented globe-trotter Deirdre, as well as G1 FWD QEII Cup (2000m) victor Win Bright.

The exciting fields for the four Group 1 features also include big-name Europeans: the six-strong Irish party includes G1 Irish Champion Stakes and G1 Champion Stakes heroine Magical – another outstanding filly on the world stage – who is set to lock horns with Almond Eye in what promises to be an enthralling Hong Kong Cup clash.

Magical’s G1-winning stable mates Circus Maximus, Magic Wand and Anthony Van Dyck are also among the event’s selected runners – the last-named is set to become the first winner of the Derby at Epsom to compete at the LONGINES HKIR. G1 Preis von Europa winner Aspetar is one of four challengers from Britain, while France has two high-class selected runners including Edisa, winner of the Jockey Club Oaks Invitational at Belmont Park in New York.

Australian representation comes in the form of the speedy mare In Her Time, a two-time G1 winner and third in the recent G1 Darley Sprint Classic (1200m).

A strong Hong Kong team is headed by established G1 big guns Beauty Generation and Exultant, and the exhilarating rising star sprinter Aethero.

Beauty Generation, Mr Stunning, Exultant and Glorious Forever completed an unprecedented Hong Kong clean-sweep of last year’s races and the quartet is engaged to defend their crowns. Beauty Generation in the Mile and Mr Stunning in the Sprint will attempt to match legendary miler Good Ba Ba’s record of three straight wins at the meeting.

Mr. Andrew Harding, the Hong Kong Jockey Club’s Executive Director, Racing, said: “The LONGINES Hong Kong International Races is firmly established among a select handful of the world’s greatest international racing occasions. We are delighted that the quality of the selected runners for this year’s LONGINES Hong Kong International Races is in keeping with our long-held commitment to deliver sporting excellence.

“Almond Eye’s participation is particularly exciting when viewed in the context of the other world-class horses selected – champions of the calibre of Beauty Generation and Exultant, other global stars like Magical and the Derby winner Anthony Van Dyck, and the list is long and strong. Factor in the potential of rising stars like Aethero, Waikuku and our Derby winner Furore and everything points to a thrilling afternoon of sport on 8 December.”

Hong Kong Cup

World superstar Almond Eye heads to Sha Tin with a record of eight wins from 10 starts, with six G1 victories to her name. After winning last year’s Fillies’ Triple Crown in Japan, the four-year-old smashed her rivals in the G1 Dubai Turf at Meydan and ran with merit at a mile when third in the G1 Yasuda Kinen. The daughter of two-time LONGINES Hong Kong Sprint winner Lord Kanaloa returned from a long summer break with an impressive success in the G1 Tenno Sho Autumn (2000m) in October. Compatriot Win Bright is one from one at the course and distance thanks to his G1 FWD QEII Cup win in April.

Among those out to prevent a sixth Japanese win in the race are the Aidan O’Brien-trained top-liner Magical, winner of the Irish and “British” Champion Stakes, and recent G1 Mackinnon Stakes winner Magic Wand. Last year’s winner Glorious Forever is engaged again, as is his full-brother and 2017 victor Time Warp but the biggest home contenders could be the improving G1-placed Rise High and last season’s BMW Hong Kong Derby hero Furore.

Hong Kong Mile

Good Ba Ba is the only horse in HKIR history to win three times and he achieved the feat in the Hong Kong Mile in consecutive years. Beauty Generation, imperious in making it two wins in a row last year and another star of world racing, will have to bounce back from two recent defeats if he is to make the hat-trick. The world’s top-rated miler will face his latest conqueror, the improving Waikuku, as well as some brilliant overseas raiders.

Japan’s assault has a formidable look to it: Indy Champ defeated Almond Eye when taking the G1 Yasuda Kinen in June and last weekend the colt saw off the highly-regarded Danon Premium to win the second of his country’s two big mile races, the G1 Mile Championship, the same two races the powerhouse champion Maurice won before taking this prize in 2015; two-time G1 winner Admire Mars, the G1-winning filly Normcore and the top-class Persian Knight are also selected for Japan. Ireland’s Circus Maximus represents the best European mile form, having won the G1 St James’s Palace Stakes and G1 Prix du Moulin this year.

Hong Kong Sprint

Mr Stunning has peaked for the last two editions of this race and will attempt to become the Hong Kong Sprint’s first three-time winner. But he faces the flash new kid on the Hong Kong sprinting block, Aethero, who will attempt to become the first Southern Hemisphere-bred three-year-old to win a G1 at the HKIR: the chestnut, sensational when winning the recent G2 Jockey Club Sprint (1200m), has drawn comparisons to past champion Able Friend. The outstanding line-up includes plenty of other top-class contenders too: the talented grey Hot King Prawn is back from a setback and is a G2 winner of untapped potential at this level, while Hong Kong’s champion sprinter Beat The Clock is in, as is D B Pin, runner-up in the past two editions.

Japan’s Danon Smash and Australia’s In Her Time provide the overseas challenge. The former is a three-time G3 winner who has posted smart efforts in Japan’s two G1 sprints this year, placing fourth in the Takamatsunomiya Kinen (1200m) and third in the Sprinters Stakes (1200m). In Her Time has won the G1 Galaxy and G1 Black Caviar Lightning and was a fine third in the G1 Darley Sprint Classic (1200m) last time.

Hong Kong Vase

Exultant has proven to be one of the world’s top stayers since winning last year’s Vase, which saw subsequent Cox Plate winner Lys Gracieux in second place and Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe hero Waldgeist in fifth. Hong Kong’s champion stayer is set to face another tough line-up with Japan and Europe offering strong contenders.

Anthony Van Dyck is set to become the first Derby (English) winner to contest the LONGINES Hong Kong Vase. The Ballydoyle-trained colt is selected alongside well-regarded stablemate Mount Everest who missed most of this year but returned in the autumn to run a promising sixth in the G1 Breeders’ Cup Turf. The British raiders are Aspetar, winner of the G1 Preis von Europa, Prince Of Arran who has made the frame in the past two renewals of the G1 Melbourne Cup, and the well-regarded G3 winner Young Rascal.

Japan has some of its best fillies and mares slated to take on Exultant: Deirdre, runner-up in the Hong Kong Cup last year, has been a marvel on her travels this year and won the G1 Nassau Stakes; Lucky Lilac won the G1 Queen Elizabeth II Cup at Kyoto last time; G1 Yushun Himba winner Loves Only You met her first defeat in five starts when third that day; Glory Vase is a G2-winning and G1-placed stayer.

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>>News List

Hong Kong Race Info

Mon,27 Jan 2020 Shatin
R Post Time Race Name Class Distance Track No.of
Horses
HKT JST
1 12:00 13:00 YUE YEE HANDICAP C5 1200m TURF 14
2 12:30 13:30 KUT CHEONG HANDICAP C4 1000m TURF 14
3 13:00 14:00 RED PACKET HANDICAP C4 1400m TURF 14
4 13:30 14:30 THE CENTENARY VASE (HANDICAP) G3 1800m TURF 11
5 14:00 15:00 PROSPERITY HANDICAP C4 1200m TURF 14
6 14:30 15:30 RED PACKET HANDICAP C4 1400m TURF 14
7 15:00 16:00 KUNG HEI HANDICAP C3 2000m TURF 14
8 15:30 16:30 THE HONG KONG CLASSIC MILE 4YO 1600m TURF 9
9 16:05 17:05 GOOD FORTUNE HANDICAP C3 1400m TURF 14
10 16:40 17:40 THE CHINESE NEW YEAR CUP (HANDICAP) C1 1400m TURF 14
11 17:15 18:15 FAT CHOI HANDICAP C3 1200m TURF 14

Tip Coliseum Hong Kong

If you register at least 1 race per race day for a total of at least 8 races per month, then your daily and monthly rankings will be posted.

Tipster Ranking is updated the day after end of the monthly tournament.>>Let's check the rules!!

Rank Tipster Name Tipster
Level
No.of Tips Highest Payout Win
Rate
Nice
Dream.limelight Dream.limelight
104 1,600R $9,292 49% 0
Ruburan Ruburan
102 2,269R $8,725 59% 0
5cd08a475d 5cd08a475d
101 3,132R $10,450 39% 0
4
Yuji Fujisawa Yuji Fujisawa
99 2,361R $55,485 16% 0
5
d2c5e365a2 d2c5e365a2
98 635R $29,435 20% 0

>>See More

Rank Tipster Name Deviation No.of Tips Hit Rate Return Rate Winnings Nice
KANPAI KANPAI
74.1 56R 16% 457% $198,205 3
unworker unworker
65.1 50R 16% 166% $32,902 0
lebron lebron
64.5 64R 28% 141% $26,390 1
4
5cd08a475d 5cd08a475d
63.5 67R 53% 121% $14,400 0
5
Mutsuki Mutsuki
62.8 62R 27% 121% $6,432 0

>>See More

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